Client-Choice Food Pantry & Summer Program

Kids, parents, teachers and really everyone looks forward to Summer – taking a swim at the local pool, heading to camp, enjoying some time off, and simply changing up the routine. And while Summer is often a highlight, it can also be a challenge for families and kids who are short on food.

To help meet the needs of our community, The Salvation Army of Northwest Arkansas has partnered with Fayetteville Public Schools (FPS) to identify and provide meals for kids who are home during the summer months. Our new client-choice Food Pantry in Fayetteville will officially open Friday, June 1 at 9 am. FPS families, who signed up through the school district, will have the opportunity to “shop” the pantry every Friday for 11 weeks at no cost.

This is the first client-choice Food Pantry for The Salvation Army of Northwest Arkansas and it offers a whole new way to think about food insecurity. “We are excited to begin providing food for families in this way. Often families are given a box of food but the items inside may not fit their needs in the best way,” said Captain Josh Robinett, NWA Area Commander. “By opening a client-choice food pantry we are giving families dignity and caring for their needs on a more individualized basis. This helps us love and care for the people of our community even more.”

The Salvation Army Client-Choice Food Pantry will be open every Friday, June 1 through August 10 from 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. and 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. The pantry will be housed in our  Activity Center building located at 219 W 15th street, Fayetteville, AR. Each week the pantry will be stocked with food options that kids and families can easily prepare for breakfast and lunch. Additionally, this pantry will provide for Washington County clients throughout the week by appointment.

This project would not be possible without support from the Walmart Foundation, the NWA Food Bank, The Salvation Army Women’s Auxiliary, Fayetteville Public Schools, and many volunteers. Together, we have been able to develop a summer program that will meet the needs of hungry families in our community. During the past three months, our team has worked to create this new shopping space. The project has included a complete remodel of our warehouse, the installation and addition of refrigeration coolers, lighting and shelving, plus the addition of many new food products – which will be added throughout the summer.

As we begin this new program, we are looking for volunteers to help stock the pantry and serve as shopping assistants each Friday.
If you’d like to help in this way, please sign up for a shift here, or give us a call. If you would like to donate funds for our summer pantry program, text NWAFOOD to 41444 or click here.

For more questions, please contact us at 479-521-2151 x 103, email jennifer.brown@uss.salvationarmy.org.

Christmas Day at Opportunities

For many people Christmas day is a day to spend with family and friends and for some it is an opportunity reach out and care for other people in the community. If you are looking for a way to give on Christmas day we’re asking you to donate items that we give out everyday at either our Fayetteville or Bentonville Shelter on Christmas Day. Specifically, this Christmas you can help by providing cans of soup, shampoo, body soap, deodorant and diapers size 3, 4 & 5. If you would like to drop off Christmas bath and body gift sets these be welcomed.

On a daily basis we provide food and health care items for families in need. At our overnight shelter we offer an evening meal that is open to anyone who is hungry in our community.

 

Salvation Army Gives Back for National Salvation Army Week

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark.- – It’s National Salvation Army Week and to celebrate, folks were out all over Northwest Arkansas delivering donuts to first responders on Monday.

This year, the Salvation Army is focusing on the importance of giving back to the community, especially the millions of Americans living in poverty. The Salvation Army said more awareness and understanding can break misconceptions about folks in need.

“We wish with each effort that we did… with each food basket we handed out… or each person we housed…or each person that we put through a program it would solve their problem for them. It isn’t always the case and we have so many people who face difficulties,” said Major Mary Matthews.

In Northwest Arkansas alone, the Salvation Army helps people with several different services including emergency shelter, addiction recovery and help with buying groceries. Each year, more than 150,000 people receive support, thanks to generous donors, volunteers and corporate partners.

http://www.nwahomepage.com/news/salvation-army-gives-back-for-national-salvation-army-week/714335966

Ashley Home Makeover


FAYETTEVILLE (KFSM) — The Salvation Army along with Ashley Furniture helped a family on Tuesday with a home makeover.

Two children’s bedrooms were remodeled and renovated, much to the kids’ surprise.

The Salvation Army said that it relies on donations through the “Red Kettle Program” to make moments like this story possible.

Donations are accepted throughout the year.

To view more photos from the event visit The Salvation Army of NWA Facebook Page.

Willowbrook Elementary Visits Shelter

NWA Democrat-Gazette/JASON IVESTER Sanjay Sanjit (cq) (left), Willowbrook Elementary kindergartener, and Aeneas Puga, fourth-grader, fill up a gift bag on Thursday, Dec. 17, 2015, inside the Salvation Army shelter in Bentonville. Students from Debbie Shiohira's (cq) kindergarten class and Bracy (cq) Jennings' fourth-grade class decided to visit the the shelter and fill and distribute 52 gift bags with snacks and drinks for the shelter's residents in lieu of having a holiday party at the school.

NWA Democrat-Gazette/JASON IVESTER
Sanjay Sanjit (cq) (left), Willowbrook Elementary kindergartener, and Aeneas Puga, fourth-grader, fill up a gift bag on Thursday, Dec. 17, 2015, inside the Salvation Army shelter in Bentonville. Students from Debbie Shiohira’s (cq) kindergarten class and Bracy (cq) Jennings’ fourth-grade class decided to visit the the shelter and fill and distribute 52 gift bags with snacks and drinks for the shelter’s residents in lieu of having a holiday party at the school.

 

NWA Democrat-Gazette/JASON IVESTER Ella Claire Rushing, Willowbrook Elementary kindergartener, fills up a gift bag on Thursday, Dec. 17, 2015, inside the Salvation Army shelter in Bentonville. Students from Debbie Shiohira's (cq) kindergarten class and Bracy (cq) Jennings' fourth-grade class decided to visit the the shelter and fill and distribute 52 gift bags with snacks and drinks for the shelter's residents in lieu of having a holiday party at the school.

Ella Claire Rushing, Willowbrook Elementary kindergartener, fills up a gift bag on Thursday, Dec. 17, 2015, inside the Salvation Army shelter in Bentonville. Students from Debbie Shiohira’s (cq) kindergarten class and Bracy (cq) Jennings’ fourth-grade class decided to visit the the shelter and fill and distribute 52 gift bags with snacks and drinks for the shelter’s residents in lieu of having a holiday party at the school.

Women’s Auxiliary of NW Arkansas

When Twyla Burt moved to Northwest Arkansas, she was in search of a nonprofit organization where she could spend her time as a volunteer. Twyla Burt, founder of the Northwest Arkansas Salvation Army Ladies Auxiliary, chose the organization as her volunteering.

She looked around, surveying the many philanthropic groups, but when it came down to it the answer was easy.

The Salvation Army.

What: needs donations of food, clothing and always more volunteers
When: year round
Where: Fayetteville and Bentonville shelters; Ladies Auxiliary in Springdale
Information:salvationarmyaok.org/nwarkansas or (479) 521-2151

“The Salvation Army has been around 150 years,” Burt says. “They’re in over 100 countries, so they must be doing something right.”

At first, she dedicated her time to cooking meals at the shelter on Thanksgiving and Christmas, then progressed to ringing bells in front of the iconic red kettle buckets and volunteering with Angel Tree, the organization’s way of providing Christmas gifts to children in need during the holiday season.

Eight years later, she’s logged some years on the board of directors and this year began the first Northwest Arkansas Salvation Army Ladies Auxiliary. The group of women act as a fundraising arm for the organization that provides food, clothing and shelter; programs for recovery from drug and alcohol abuse and after-school services for children, like snacks and summer programs.

Ladies Auxiliary is “independent; we’re not members of the Salvation Army, we’re not officers,” says Burt, director of the auxiliary. “We’re residents of the area, all volunteers. Everything we do, we do for the [Salvation Army] programs. The money that we raise during our fundraisers go 100 percent to the programs.”

The reason those programs are so important, she says, is because it’s all some of their clients have. Many of the men who enter the Corps Salvage and Rehabilitation Center (CSRC) have been turned away by their family members, don’t have a job and have no way to receive proper services to get themselves back on track.

“A lot of our programs, if we cut them, it would meant the difference between life and death,” Burt says. “In the program that deals with drug and alcohol abuse, some of those men — if they didn’t get any help — could not afford to go to an individual facility that handles [recovery from that]. They might be on the street.”

Instead, the CSRC gives them help distancing themselves from those substances and overcoming their addictions — meanwhile providing a place for them to work, stay and subsequently make friends, do their laundry, have regular hot meals.

It’s a place where they can reconfigure before trying again to find jobs, repair relationships and get back to life as they knew it. And most importantly, it’s a place where anyone who walks through the door can get the most valued commodity of all: respect.

Burt sees it especially during Thanksgiving and Christmas, as she hands out food, looks them in the eye and wishes them a happy holiday.

“They’re just like you and I, they just want respect,” she says. “They’re down on their luck. They might have had a job making $100,000 a year before; lost everything and they’re trying to get back on their feet.”

What we do “is try to give people hope [because] with hope comes healing.”

Rewarding for Burt, too, is the company she keeps while volunteering. Many of the Salvation Army officers, members and volunteers grew up with the Salvation Army as the only constant in their lives, amid multiple moves, unstable home life and trouble fitting in at school.

“It’s impressive [to meet them] because you can see where Salvation Army made a difference in their lives,” she says. “Those children would have fallen between the cracks if they hadn’t had that stable environment to go to and … learn how to deal with life.”

Children who spend time at the Salvation Army shelters can pop in for snacks after school and get a bag of food to take home. Salvation Army provides that because the ones who show up on their doorstep aren’t getting much more to eat than what’s provided at school, Burt says. Summer programs send the children to camp for a week at next to no cost to their families — often giving them a chance to travel for the first time and create lasting friendships.

It gives them a chance to experience that same respect that the men of CSRC are looking for and a chance to gain the sort of supportive relationships that they deserve. Because for the many families living in poverty in Northwest Arkansas, life is very different.

Burt recalls a man who asked a Salvation Army lieutenant for help with his son, who he claimed was stealing. When the lieutenant dug deeper, he realized the boy was simply helping himself to a snack in the refrigerator in his own home.

“People who grow up in poverty look at things differently,” Burt says. “The children don’t get anything and they suffer. Most people don’t see that; we live in our own world and don’t want to see things like that.

“But when you step down and start listening and looking around, there’s a lot [to see].”

NAN Profiles on 12/13/2015

Photographer: Michael Woods Credit: NWA Democrat-Gazette
NWA Democrat Gazette Online

Angel Tree 2015 is Underway!

(KFSM) — As the holiday season draws nearer, it calls for the return of the Salvation Army’s Angel Tree program.

The program starts Wednesday (Nov. 18) at 18 locations in the River Valley and Northwest Arkansas.

The Angel Tree program relies on community support to provide new clothing, toys and food for thousands of needy children in Northwest Arkansas and the River Valley. Trees at the different locations are decorated with Angel Tags, which contain a child’s first name, age, gender and gift wishes.

Contributors can remove one or more tags from the tree and purchase the appropriate gifts for the child described on the tag. Then they can simply attach the tag to the gifts and return it to the location where they picked up the tag.

In addition to the gifts, the Salvation Army will also be providing food for each family in the program.

The Northwest Arkansas pickup locations are:

Northwest Arkansas Mall 4201 N. Shiloh Drive, Fayetteville
Walmart 3919 N. Mall Ave. , Fayetteville
Walmart 2875 W. Martin Luther King Blvd., Fayetteville
Walmart 2004 S. Pleasant, Springdale
Walmart 2110 W. Walnut, Rogers
Walmart 4208 Pleasant Crossing, Rogers
Walmart 406 Sam Walton, Bentonville
Walmart 2901 Hwy 412 East, Siloam Springs
Walmart 157 Gary Hatfield Way, Huntsville

5 News Online

Donations Needed

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February 12th, 2014
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

THE SALVATION ARMY NEEDS DONATIONS

Fayetteville, AR (February 12, 2014) – The Salvation Army of Northwest Arkansas is running low on donations such as furniture and clothing items.

Donations of these items have been lower than usual over the past several months and it has caused our stores to run low.

If you would like to give, you can drop off donations at any Salvation Army location.  You can also call and have us pick up a donation at 479-521-2151.

About The Salvation Army

The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in 1865, has been supporting those in need in His name without discrimination for more than 130 years in the United States. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through the broadest array of social services that range from providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless and opportunities for underprivileged children. 82 cents of every dollar spent is used to support those services in 5,000 communities nationwide. For more information, go to www.salvationarmyusa.org